Did you know you could be a Technical Writer if you major in English?

Did you know you could be a Technical Writer if you major in English?

NC State University English Department  Did you know you could be a Technical Writer if you major in English? Screen Shot 2014 11 13 at 6 NC State University  Did you know you could be a Technical Writer if you major in English? Screen Shot 2014 11 13 at 6

I am currently a student at North Carolina State University Department of English.

My journey as an aspiring technical writing began two years ago when I discovered at North Carolina State University that I wanted to major in the English, Language, Writing, and Rhetoric program. From there, I realized my passion for grammar and composition and wanted only to learn more about how I could transition this knowledge from college to career. Working with the English department at NCSU, I was able to learn of all of the exciting professional opportunities there were for those who majored in English. This is where I learned of the growing and demanding career for technical writers in small and large businesses. It is most important for businesses to have someone, such as a technical writer, who is skilled in documentation. Businesses of all sizes benefit from having a technical writer because they are not only able to make certain things are presented professionally, but also logically.

Technical writers are also referred to as technical communicators. As a professional communicator, it is their responsibility to portray technical information to customers, clients, and work personnel in a way that every one can apprehend and present complex material in a way that is easily understandable.

Technical writers spend majority of their time preparing instruction manuals, journal articles, appendices, etc. in order to set criteria regarding clarity, terminology, and most importantly conciseness. They are often required to complete large amounts of research before presenting any type of formal documentation.

In order to become a technical writer, a college degree is usually required. Normally employers prefer individuals who have pursued a field of study in a technical or communications subject. To add an extra edge, employers appreciate those who have also acquired additional knowledge in the structure and content of the English language as well as familiarity with computer science.

Allyson Marie Warren

The author is a student of College of Humanities and Social Sciences- English, LWR, North Carolina State University. Her email is amwarre2@ncsu.edu.

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